The Goal.

California can't borrow its way out of this problem: It's too big. Instead, the state must develop an infrastructure strategy that will support California's long-term economic growth--one that includes new ways of financing public works projects.

The Problem.

It could be the state's biggest budget challenge: California must invest $750 billion in public facilities over the next 10 years to meet the needs of a growing population--from upgrading school buildings to expanding public transit. Problem is, the state doesn't have that kind of money.

FEATURED STORIES

April 27, 2015

EIFDs get two thumbs up at L.A. infrastructure gathering

Tool for funding badly needed local and regional infrastructure projects and maintenance gains interest across the state Read More »

Infrastructure
April 06, 2015

Consensus building around new infrastructure financing authority: “These tools can work”

Robust infrastructure funding tool being seen as smart alternative to defunct redevelopment authority Read More »

Infrastructure
April 08, 2015

CA Fwd report: Prosperity depends on new approach to investing in infrastructure and education

New report highlights revenue options for making investments in top priorities for state regionally and statewide Read More »

REPORTING

New transportation package raises taxes but also increases accountability in how money is spent
April 28, 2017 by Jim Mayer

New transportation package raises taxes but also increases accountability in how money is spent

Road funding also attaches new metrics and accountability measures to the $52 billion to be spent over 10 years Read More »

Commentary: With no state action on roads, regional solutions needed
October 26, 2016 by Mark Pisano and Sean Randolph

Commentary: With no state action on roads, regional solutions needed

The next generation of transportation solutions need to be created at the local and regional level Read More »

Commentary: Our Roads and Bridges: The Fix Is Not In
June 17, 2016 by Will Kempton

Commentary: Our Roads and Bridges: The Fix Is Not In

State infrastructure investment not keeping up with need, but Californians need assurances that additional funds will be dedicated, protected, and efficiently spent.  Read More »

California tool to fund badly needed infrastructure growing in popularity
March 28, 2016

California tool to fund badly needed infrastructure growing in popularity

The EIFD is currently being considered for 60 projects across the state, including Sacramento bridges and L.A. River revitalization. Read More »

VIDEO: El Niño’s not enough—Storage is a vital part of California water game plan
March 10, 2016

VIDEO: El Niño’s not enough—Storage is a vital part of California water game plan

New California Assembly Speaker talks about how storage benefits many efforts to capture and conserve more water. Read More »

Summit shares ideas on ending sprawl, expanding water conservation with environmental leaders
March 09, 2016

Summit shares ideas on ending sprawl, expanding water conservation with environmental leaders

Symposium highlighted need for allies beyond usual environmental groups in effort to craft land use and water plans for sustainable growth. Read More »

Legislative wrap-up: California housing solution is under construction
October 14, 2015

Legislative wrap-up: California housing solution is under construction

Overview of legislative results and wins for Summit toward spurring investment in housing and infrastructure Read More »

How to pay for local infrastructure projects? New website offers an answer
September 30, 2015 by Darin Dinsmore

How to pay for local infrastructure projects? New website offers an answer

Recent legislation expands local governments’ infrastructure financing powers that will help build investments in projects from transit stations, housing to next-gen water facilities. Read More »

 1 2 3 >  Last ›

Brought to you by CAFwd

What's at stake?

Infrastructure is the physical network all around us made of roads, rails, water systems, ports, airports, schools, internet access and more. It's no stretch to call it the backbone of the economy.